March 27, 2022 – Fourth Sunday of Lent

Mar 28, 2022 | Blogs, Fr. Luke, Homilies

“Now we must celebrate and rejoice, because your brother was dead and has come to life again; he was lost and has been found.”  Words from our Gospel today, from the 15th chapter of the Gospel according to St. Luke – sisters and brothers, may the Lord give to you his peace and his joy.

I am gradually discovering what it means to say that my son-ship and the son-ship of Jesus are one, that my return and the return of Jesus are one, that my home and the home of Jesus are one.  There is no journey to God outside of the journey that Jesus has made.  Therefore, today I want to think about the parable of today’s Gospel in a different light: that is, seeing Jesus himself as the Prodigal son.  Indeed, Jesus, who told this story to those who criticized him for associating with sinners, himself lived the long and painful journey that he describes.  And so, the return of the prodigal son becomes the return of the Son of God.  For Jesus himself left the house of his heavenly Father, came to a foreign land, gave away all that he had, and returned through his cross to his Father’s home.  All this he did, not as a rebellious son, but as the obedient son, sent out to bring home all the lost children of God. 

Frere Pierre Marie, the founder of the Fraternity of Jerusalem, a community of monks living in the holy city, reflects on Jesus as the prodigal son in a very poetic and biblical way.  He writes: He, who was born not from human stock, or human desire or human will, but from God himself, one day took to himself everything that was under his footstool and he left with his inheritance, his title of Son, and the whole ransom price.  He left for a far country… the faraway land… where he became as human beings are and emptied himself.  His own people did not accept him and his first bed was a bed of straw!  Like a root in arid ground, he grew up before us, he was despised, the lowest of men, before whom one covers his face.  Very soon, he came to know exile, hostility, loneliness…  After having given away everything in a life of bounty, his worth, his peace, his light, his truth, his life… all the treasures of knowledge and wisdom and the hidden mystery kept secret for endless ages; after having lost himself among the lost children of the house of Israel, spending his time with the sick (and not with the well-to-do), with the sinners (and not with the just), and even with the prostitutes to whom he promised entrance into the Kingdom of his Father; after having been treated as a glutton and a drunkard, as a friend of tax collectors and sinners, as a Samaritan, a possessed, a blasphemer; after having offered everything, even his body and his blood; after having felt deeply in himself sadness, anguish, and a troubled soul; after having gone to the bottom of despair, with which he voluntarily dressed himself as being abandoned by his Father far away from the source of living water, he cried out from the cross on which he was nailed: “I am thirsty.”  He was laid to rest in the dust and the shadow of death.  And there, on the third day, he rose up from the depths of hell to where he had descended, burdened with the crimes of us all, he bore our sins, our sorrows he carried.  Standing straight, he cried out: “Yes, I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God, and your God.”  And he re-ascended to heaven.  Then in the silence, looking at his Son and all his children, since his Son had become all in all, the Father said to his servants, “Quick!  Bring out the best robe and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet; let us eat and celebrate!  Because my children who, as you know, were dead have returned to life; they were lost and have been found again!  My prodigal Son has brought them all back.”  They all began to have a feast dressed in their long robes washed white in the blood of the Lamb.[1] 

The story of the return of the prodigal son becomes the summary of our salvation history, in which our compassionate God has come in solidarity to redeem our plight as his very own.  To see in this tired, broken young man the person of Jesus himself brings much comfort and consolation.  There is nothing, nothing outside of our human experience that is foreign to God.  His story is my story, our story.  The young man being embraced by the Father is no longer just one repentant sinner, but the whole of humanity returning to God.  The broken body of the prodigal becomes the broken body of humanity, of all suffering people longing to reenter the lost paradise.  As Jesus shares this life with us and all of us share this with him, together picking up our crosses to follow him and make that return journey home with Christ as his disciples, we can truly celebrate and rejoice, for we will find where once there was darkness and death, there will be life again, and what was lost has been found, all by the grace of God…

I am gradually discovering what it means to say that my son-ship and the son-ship of Jesus are one, that my return and the return of Jesus are one, that my home and the home of Jesus are one.  There is no journey to God outside of the journey that Jesus himself has made. 

Readings: https://bible.usccb.org/bible/readings/032722-YearC.cfm

Fourth Sunday of Lent
Year C Readings

Lectionary: 33

Reading I

Jos 5:9a, 10-12

The LORD said to Joshua,
“Today I have removed the reproach of Egypt from you.”

While the Israelites were encamped at Gilgal on the plains of Jericho,
they celebrated the Passover
on the evening of the fourteenth of the month.
On the day after the Passover,
they ate of the produce of the land
in the form of unleavened cakes and parched grain.
On that same day after the Passover,
on which they ate of the produce of the land, the manna ceased.
No longer was there manna for the Israelites,
who that year ate of the yield of the land of Canaan.

Responsorial Psalm

Ps 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7.

  1. (9a) Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.
    I will bless the LORD at all times;
    his praise shall be ever in my mouth.
    Let my soul glory in the LORD;
                the lowly will hear me and be glad.
    R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.
    Glorify the LORD with me,
                let us together extol his name.
    I sought the LORD, and he answered me
                and delivered me from all my fears.
    R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.
    Look to him that you may be radiant with joy,
                and your faces may not blush with shame.
    When the poor one called out, the LORD heard,
                and from all his distress he saved him.
    R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.

Reading II

2 Cor 5:17-21

Brothers and sisters:
Whoever is in Christ is a new creation:
the old things have passed away;
behold, new things have come.
And all this is from God,
who has reconciled us to himself through Christ
and given us the ministry of reconciliation,
namely, God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ,
not counting their trespasses against them
and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation.
So we are ambassadors for Christ,
as if God were appealing through us.
We implore you on behalf of Christ,
be reconciled to God.
For our sake he made him to be sin who did not know sin,
so that we might become the righteousness of God in him.

Verse before the Gospel

Lk 15:18

I will get up and go to my Father and shall say to him:
Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you.

Gospel

Lk 15:1-3, 11-32

Tax collectors and sinners were all drawing near to listen to Jesus,
but the Pharisees and scribes began to complain, saying,
“This man welcomes sinners and eats with them.”
So to them Jesus addressed this parable:
“A man had two sons, and the younger son said to his father,
‘Father give me the share of your estate that should come to me.’
So the father divided the property between them.
After a few days, the younger son collected all his belongings
and set off to a distant country
where he squandered his inheritance on a life of dissipation.
When he had freely spent everything,
a severe famine struck that country,
and he found himself in dire need.
So he hired himself out to one of the local citizens
who sent him to his farm to tend the swine.
And he longed to eat his fill of the pods on which the swine fed,
but nobody gave him any.
Coming to his senses he thought,
‘How many of my father’s hired workers
have more than enough food to eat,
but here am I, dying from hunger.
I shall get up and go to my father and I shall say to him,
“Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you.
I no longer deserve to be called your son;
treat me as you would treat one of your hired workers.”’
So he got up and went back to his father.
While he was still a long way off,
his father caught sight of him, and was filled with compassion.
He ran to his son, embraced him and kissed him.
His son said to him,
‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you;
I no longer deserve to be called your son.’
But his father ordered his servants,
‘Quickly bring the finest robe and put it on him;
put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet.
Take the fattened calf and slaughter it.
Then let us celebrate with a feast,
because this son of mine was dead, and has come to life again;
he was lost, and has been found.’
Then the celebration began.
Now the older son had been out in the field
and, on his way back, as he neared the house,
he heard the sound of music and dancing.
He called one of the servants and asked what this might mean.
The servant said to him,
‘Your brother has returned
and your father has slaughtered the fattened calf
because he has him back safe and sound.’
He became angry,
and when he refused to enter the house,
his father came out and pleaded with him.
He said to his father in reply,
‘Look, all these years I served you
and not once did I disobey your orders;
yet you never gave me even a young goat to feast on with my friends.
But when your son returns
who swallowed up your property with prostitutes,
for him you slaughter the fattened calf.’
He said to him,
‘My son, you are here with me always;
everything I have is yours.
But now we must celebrate and rejoice,
because your brother was dead and has come to life again;
he was lost and has been found.’”

 

[1] Henri Nouwen, The Return of the Prodigal Son (Doubleday: New York, NY, 1992), pgs. 55-58.